Less grace and more law?

Is a grace, grace, grace approach to preaching ineffective in our cultural environment? Perhaps what we need as an antidote to sin/immorality is more preaching of law?

Some thoughts from Tim Keller (seen here):

(A quick note about a metaphor he uses below: Newcastle is a city in the UK historically known to contain huge natural reserves of coal — so to “carry coal to Newcastle” is to bring the city more of what it already has).

Some claim that to constantly be striking a ‘note of grace, grace, grace’ in our sermons is not helpful in our culture today. The objection goes like this: “Surely Phariseeism and moralism is not a problem in our culture today. Rather, our problem is license and antinomianism. People lack a sense of right or wrong. It is ‘carrying coal to Newcastle’ to talk about grace all the time to postmodern people.” But I don’t believe that’s the case. Unless you point to the ‘good news’ of grace, people won’t even be able to bear the ‘bad news’ of God’s judgment. Also, unless you critique moralism, many irreligious people won’t know the difference between moralism and what you’re offering. The way to get antinomians to move away from lawlessness is to distinguish the gospel from legalism. Why? Because modern and post-modern people have been rejecting Christianity for years thinking that it was indistinguishable from moralism. Non-Christians will always automatically hear gospel presentations as appeals to become moral and religious, unless in your preaching you use the good news of grace to deconstruct legalism. Only if you show them there’s a difference–that what they really rejected wasn’t real Christianity at all–will they even begin to consider Christianity.

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One thought on “Less grace and more law?

  1. Pingback: Field Notes on Grace « fellowshipofsaintsandsinners

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